Top 10 In Demand Occupations

1 Software Developers for Apps
2 General + Operations Managers
3 All Other Managers
4 RNs (Nurses)
5 Business Operations Specialists
6 Civil Engineers
7 Financial Managers
8 Aircraft Mechanics + Service Technicians
9 Respiratory Therapists
10 Electrical Engineering Technicians

As the level of competition for highly skilled workers heats up, the importance of clearly identifying workforce needs is greater than ever. Our region’s ability to aggressively advocate for fully aligned education and training systems will be foundational to our economic development success. With these goals in mind, the Las Vegas Global Economic Alliance (LVGEA), Las Vegas Metro Chamber of Commerce (LVMCC), and Workforce Connections have teamed up to unite the business community around a new, comprehensive workforce strategy, known as Workforce Blueprint 2.0.

Workforce Blueprint 2.0 is designed to be an innovative, data-driven approach to solving regional workforce issues. The Blueprint approach is designed to accomplish the following goals:

  • Identify Southern Nevada’s current and future workforce needs
  • Identify education and training capacity to meet workforce needs along with corresponding gaps and/or surpluses
  • Publish a Top 100 list of in-demand occupations
  • Identify how regional education and training capacity has changed since the original Blueprint was published
  • Create a Workforce Report Card with annual workforce performance indicators to monitor progress
  • Advocate for fully aligned education and training systems

By leveraging the unique strengths of each organization, LVGEA, LVMCC, and Workforce Connections have the opportunity to significantly improve the alignment of regional education and training providers.

In Demand Occupations: Demand vs. Supply

The final step in determining how existing public higher education programs correlate to forecasted demand involved allocating 2017 graduates, by degree program, across each occupation to determine an annual “workforce pipeline,” thereby illustrating where gaps—large and small—may exist relative to ongoing employment needs to satisfy forecast and growth targets.

Ranking High Demand Occupation Up/Down from 2017 Annual Openings w/ Forecasted Demand Annual Pipeline Forecasted Workforce Gap/Surplus
1 Software Developers, Applications Up 233 31 -202
2 General + Operations Managers Equal 1,476 327 -1149
3 Managers, All Other Down 752
4 RNs (Registered Nurses) Up 1,363 629 -734
5 Business Operations Specialists, All Other Down 841
6 Civil Engineers N/A 122 26 -96
7 Financial Managers Up 504 106 -398
8 Aircraft Mechanics and Service Technicians Up 166 9 -157
9 Respiratory Therapists Up 80 48 -32
10 Electrical and Electronics Engineering Technicians N/A 157 14 -143
11 Market Research Analysts and Marketing Specialists Up 323 95 -228
12 Computer User Support Specialists Up 233 96 -137
13 Management Analysts Equal 287 20 -267
14 Architectural and Engineering Managers Down 68 77 9
15 Maintenance and Repair Worker, General Up 1,244 N/A
16 Electronics Engineer, Except Computer Up 70 11 -59
17 Electrical Engineers Up 50 8 -42
18 Construction Managers Down 398 33 -365
19 Computer Systems Analysts Down 141 32 -109
20 Accountants and Auditors Down 762 332 -430
21 Laborers and Freight, Stock, And Material Movers, Hand Up 3,287 N/A
22 Sales Managers Up 312 169 -143
23 Pharmacists Down 131 80 -51
24 Compliance Officers Up 164 N/A
25 Elementary School Teachers, Except Special Education N/A 784 117 -667
26 Engineers, All Other N/A 44 37 -7
27 Combine Food Preparation and Serving Workers, Including Fast Food Up 6,289
28 Nurse Practitioners N/A 40 16 -24
29 Computer Occupations, All Other Down 175 96 -79
30 Information Security Analysts Up 44 16 -28
31 First-Line Supervisors of Production and Operating Workers Up 201 27 -174
32 Secondary School Teachers, Except Special and Career/Technical Education N/A 444 657 213
33 First-Line Supervisors of Construction Trades and Extraction Workers NA 475
34 Health Technologists and Technicians, All Other Up 134 112 -22
35 Medical and Health Services Managers Up 155 102 -53
36 Cost Estimators Down 182 48 -134
37 Electricians Up 792
38 Physical Therapists Down 97 60 -37
39 Automotive Service Technicians and Mechanics N/A 458 24 -434
40 Middle School Teachers, Except special and Career/Technical Education N/A 348 52 -296
41 Web Developers Up 68 29 -39
42 Environmental Scientists and Specialists, Including Health N/A 48 20 -28
43 First Line Supervisors of Mechanics, Installers, and Repairers Down 247 53 -194
44 First-Line Supervisors of Food Preparation and Serving Workers Up 1,345 11 -1334
45 Veterinary Assistants and Laboratory Animal Caretakers Up 109
46 Aerospace Engineers N/A 41 17 -24
47 Industry Machinery Mechanics Up 68
48 Training and Development Specialists N/A 245 12 -233
49 Mechanical Engineers Up 30 8 -22
50 Sales Representatives, Wholesale and Manufacturing, Except Technical and Scientific Products Down 853 2 -851

Job Growth Targets for 2026 by Target Industry

The final consideration in determining how current higher education programs correlate to forecast demand involves the number of graduates produced in 2016 data by these regional programs and allocating those graduates across each occupation to determine an annual “workforce pipeline,” thereby illustrating where gaps – large and small – may exist relative to ongoing employment needs to satisfy forecast and growth targets.

Each aspirational growth factor used in determining these growth projections was selected based on known growth data and economic trends. These factors represent the extent to which occupational demand is expected to exceed that of the benchmark forecast that is more conservative in nature. These results are presented in the form of both a 10-year aspirational growth rate (based on 2016 actual employment) and new jobs that would be created by 2026 if this aspirational growth factor is fully realized.

Ranking High Demand Occupation Base 2016 Employment 2018 Employment 10-Year Projected Growth Rate New Jobs Created w/ Forecasted Growth 2026 Forecasted Target
1 Business Headquarters + Services 130,985 143,590 36% 47,336 178,321
2 Emerging Technology 7,042 8,171 29.3% 2,681 9,723
3 Logistics, Mfg + Supply Chain Mgmt 45,132 54,821 33% 2,681 9,723
4 Autonomous Systems 5,217 5,891 36% 1,854 7,071
5 Finance, Banking + Insurance 25,589 27,490 17% 4,432 30,021
6 Health Care Services + Medical Edu 73,446 81,394 27% 19,561 93,007
7 Gaming, Tourism + Conventions 285,165 291,669 18% 50,878 336,043

In Demand Occupations: By Target Industry

Business HQ + Services

High Demand Occupation Secondary Target Idustry Alignment Annual Openings w/ Forecasted Demand Annual Pipeline Forecasted Regional Workforce Gap/Surplus
Business Operations Specialists Logistics, MFG + Supply Chain 495 N/A -510
Market Research Analysts + Marketing Specialists Logistics, MFG + Supply Chain 310 95 -228
Financial Managers Logistics, MFG + Supply Chain 223 96 -137
Management Analysts Logistics, MFG + Supply Chain 287 20 -267
Computer User Support Specialist Emerging Technology 141 N/A -141

Emerging Technology

High Demand Occupation Secondary Target Idustry Alignment Annual Openings w/ Forecasted Demand Annual Pipeline Forecasted Regional Workforce Gap/Surplus
Software Specialists for Apps Autonomous Systems 211 31 -202
Computer Systems Analysts Business HQ + Services 133 N/A -141
Information Security Analysts Business HQ + Services 41 -25 -28
Web Developers Business HQ + Services 65 -36 -39
Environmental Scientists + Specialists Logistics, MFG, Supply Chain 45 -25 -28

Logistics, MFG + Supply Chain

High Demand Occupation Secondary Target Idustry Alignment Annual Openings w/ Forecasted Demand Annual Pipeline Forecasted Regional Workforce Gap/Surplus
Civil Engineers Business HQ + Services 117 -91 -96
Aircraft Mechanics + Service Techs N/A 149 -140 -157
Electrical Engineering Techs Autonomous Systems 148 -134 -143
Architectural + Engineering Managers Autonomous Systems 64 13 9
Electronics Engineers Autonomous Systems 65 -54 -59

Autonomous Systems

High Demand Occupation Secondary Target Idustry Alignment Annual Openings w/ Forecasted Demand Annual Pipeline Forecasted Regional Workforce Gap/Surplus
Software Developers for Apps Emerging Technology 211 -180 -202
Computer Systems Analysts Business HQ + Services 133 -133 -141
Information Security Analysts Logistics, MFG + Supply Chain 37 -20 -24
Aerospace Engineers Logistics, MFG + Supply Chain 37 -88 -92
Network + Computer Systems Admin Business HQ + Services 90 -88 -92

Finance, Banking + Insurance

High Demand Occupation Secondary Target Idustry Alignment Annual Openings w/ Forecasted Demand Annual Pipeline Forecasted Regional Workforce Gap/Surplus
Financial Managers Business HQ + Services 482 -376 -398
Management Analysts Business HQ + Services 277 -257 -267
Accountants + Auditors Gaming, Tourism + Conventions 732 -400 -430
First-Line Supervisors of Office + Admin Health Care Services + Med Edu 1061 -873 -883
Loan Officers N/A 214 -205 -210

Health Care Services + Medical Education

High Demand Occupation Secondary Target Idustry Alignment Annual Openings w/ Forecasted Demand Annual Pipeline Forecasted Regional Workforce Gap/Surplus
Registered Nurses N/A 1324 -695 -734
Respiratory Therapists N/A 77 -29 -32
Pharmacists N/A 127 -47 -51
Nurse Practitioners N/A 38 -22 -24
Health Technologists + Techs 130 130 -18 -22

Gaming, Tourism + Conventions

High Demand Occupation Secondary Target Idustry Alignment Annual Openings w/ Forecasted Demand Annual Pipeline Forecasted Regional Workforce Gap/Surplus
Accountants + Auditors Finance, Banking + Insurance 732 -400 -430
First-Line Supervisors of Office + Admin N/A 1328 -1317 -1334
Chefs + Head Cooks N/A 460 -456 -462
First-Line Supervisors of Housekeeping + Janitorial N/A 492 -492 -498
Cooks, Restaurant N/A 2987 -2962 -3002

Workforce Report Card

As Southern Nevada’s economy continues to grow, it will be imperative to continually re-assess progress toward addressing known workforce demand gaps or challenges. In response, LVGEA—in tandem with Workforce Connections and the Las Vegas Metro Chamber of Commerce—assembled stakeholders and partners in economic and workforce development to provide input into the creation of the region’s first Workforce Report Card.

This report card contains performance indicators across three distinct categories with clear connectivity to workforce development: K-12 education, postsecondary education, and talent and training. Initial data points for each indicator provide a clear foundation upon which the community can track and measure performance toward workforce development goals, both in quantity and quality.

The report card will be updated annually, with progress and movement across indicators used as a basis for implementing or funding new programs, adjusting curricula, or other actions that help ensure a high-quality workforce that meets the continued and growing needs of the regional economy.

Indicates changes compared to previous year's performance.

K-12

AP Participation 14,126
CTE Participation 66K
High School Graduates (Public Schools) 21K
College-Ready Graduates (Public Schools) 45%

AP Test Passage: 51.3% Southern Nevada | 59% National

0
100

ACT Scores: 17.45 Southern Nevada | 20.8 National

1
36

Talent and Training

Completed Apprenticeships 469
Employed Females 54.9%
Employed Foreign-Born Residents 64.7%
Employment by Target Industry 27.5%

Average Wages (Associate Degree or Less) $23.82 Southern Nevada |

0
25

Net Migration: +50,695 Nevada | +19,193 National

0
60K

Postsecondary Education

ACT Workkeys National Career Readiness Certificate (NCRC) 7881
Certificate Completers 1365
Associate Graduates 3331
Bachelor's Graduates 4588
Recent Graduates Employed in Nevada 58.4%

Associate Degree-Holding Population: 7.7% Southern Nevada |

0
100

Bachelor's+ Degree-Holding Population: 24.4% Southern Nevada |

0
100

Methodology

The methodology used to guide this analysis was structured to mirror the initial Workforce Blueprint analysis, allowing for direct correlations and comparisons of key data variables. It also includes slight modifications based on available data, such as inclusion of wage data in the high-demand occupations ranking criteria, helping to reinforce the context and confidence of any associated demand or supply projections and resulting decisions.

In addition to the data inputs used to build this analysis, significant qualitative input from Southern Nevada stakeholders helped to guide the observations and findings contained within this report. Source data from stakeholders, while not publicly available, provided yet another valuable input to this analysis.

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